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Fellowships at CSCS
The CSCS Fellowships Programme began in 2002 to make its substantial library and faculty resources available to a range of researchers outside the institution.

Conferences and Workshops
List of conferences and workshops held at and conducted by CSCS in recent years.

Visiting Fellows
CSCS provides affiliation to Indian and international researchers for varying periods of time. In addition CSCS also invites academics to interact with faculty and students and to present their work at the Centre.




Current State: Published
10. The Country and the City




Our understanding of the category ‘culture’ is often fed by the spaces within which the notion of culture is performed. Even in the most commonsensical exploration of what culture has come to mean—culture as practice, process, performance, or representation—the sense of space is always present. This section tries to chart out how culture is embedded in a spatial analysis and how an inquiry into the spaces around us can lead to a better understanding of what culture can come to mean. While this section focuses on the creation of city spaces and the notion of urban cultures as we can observe them in our contemporary and immediate environments, it will also try to take into account the notion of the rural and how it is produced, shaped, and defined by the changing contours of the urban.




Placing the Space

Images of the road in ahmedabad
These two images of a road in Ahmedabad, give an idea of how space is constructed on the place.

The city and the village

Activity 1

Activity 2

Visibility
A spatial analysis of these problematic areas—the village in the city, for instance, would help us in understanding what aspects are rendered more visible. Questioning why these certain aspects are visible in the definition of a category would help in looking at what is being suppressed and what is at stake in this process. If we identify the categories of ‘City’ and ‘Village’ as constructs, it would be very useful to ask the questions:

1. Who constructs these categories?

2. What are the processes by which they are constructed?

3. Are there legitimate and illegitimate ways of representing a space?

4. Who are the expected consumers/occupants of that space?

Activity 3

Picture 1

Picture 2

5. Where are these representations circulated? Do these representations themselves come to affect or manipulate the original categories that they represent?

So far, we have posited the following ideas:

Utopia-Dystopia
We shall approach the two articles prescribed for this section with these ideas in mind, looking at how the changing faces of cities and villages are represented, analysed and discussed in the context of globalisation and modernity in India. However, before that we need to deal with the pervasive dichotomy of Utopia-Dystopia.

Activity 4
Let us see if we can identify a few utopian and dystopian visions by looking at a few urban legends. Given below are a few samples of Utopia/Dystopia in different forms. Identify whether the given excerpt is an example of utopia or dystopia. Try to analyse the markers that allow you to make the identification. See if you can spot the ‘moral behind the story’ and analyse what these visions might be critiquing.

Sample # 1

Sample # 2

The Unintended City

Activity 5

Poverty and the City

Activity 6
This is an excerpt from Ashis Nandy’s essay. Read it carefully and then answer the questions given after it to examine the excerpt.

Conclusion

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