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Conferences and Workshops
List of conferences and workshops held at and conducted by CSCS in recent years.

Visiting Fellows
CSCS provides affiliation to Indian and international researchers for varying periods of time. In addition CSCS also invites academics to interact with faculty and students and to present their work at the Centre.

Fellowships at CSCS
The CSCS Fellowships Programme began in 2002 to make its substantial library and faculty resources available to a range of researchers outside the institution.




Current State: Published
7. The Identity Question




Political Identities and Identity Politics

Identity formation is a complex process. It calls for the sharing of a common culture on the one hand, and harps on separateness from others, on the other. As Stuart Hall argues

“Far from the still small point of truth inside us, identities actually come from outside, they are the way in which we are recognised and then come to step into the place of the recognitions which others give us. Without the others there is no self. There is no self-recognition”(Hall, 1995;8).

In other words, identities take shape over a period of time for varied ends and through as varied means. They are historically arrived at, sociologically presented and discursively constituted. This necessitates a reading of the contexts located across cultural, social, political and economic spaces to comprehend what identities are and how they are constituted. However, what is fundamental to all identities is, as Laclau and Mouffe argue, a process of struggle for recognition from the other. Recall what you have read about ‘the other’ in the fourth and fifth modules. The other could be other individuals, contesting communities and social groups or the State. Politics of recognition bring together identities into a process of mutual reciprocity. In a country such as India, identities have been constituted around caste (dalits/brahmins), gender (men/women); ethnicity or nationality (Assamese/Bodos), language (Hindi/Non-Hindi speaking peoples), class and sexuality (Heterosexuals/Homosexuals and Lesbians).




Activity
Read the following excerpt from Dalit Identity and Politics, by Ghanshyam Shah (ed) pages 20-23.

Subject positions

Questions
1. It is important to note that all identities, not merely the Bodo identity or Dalit identity, emerge over a period of time, in response to historical conditions. Can you demonstrate that identities are necessarily fluid and multiple? Try and list different facets of your identity and see if you can recognise how the aspects you privilege (Hindu/Christian/Muslim, etc; male or female; Kannada/Tamil/Telugu speaker) have changed over time and in different circumstances. 2. With specific reference to the excerpt above, what are the various methods used by the Bodos to construct a sub-nationalist identity?

Why are Identities Constructed?

Activity
Click here to read Gail Omvedt "Ambedkar and After: Dalit Movement in India" in Ghanshyam Shah (ed). If you would like to explore the connections between identity politics and globalisation, you could read Thomas Hylland Eriksen’s article “Globalisation and the Politics of Identity” from the Autumn, 1999 UN Chronicle [Go to: http://folk.uio.no/geirthe/UNChron.html]

Identities and Democracy

Resolving the Dilemma?

Activity
Click here to read the chapter "Politics of Identity and Difference" in Upendra Baxi, The Future of Human Rights, OUP, 2002. Please note that you will read more about the demand for special rights based on marginalized identities in a later module on rights discourses.

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